The Lived Experience of Architecture
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Craig Tait, Architect, September 2018.


As we prepare to open our studio at Edinburgh’s Doors Open Day, we are reminded of the value of experiencing the spaces in our city in person.

“It is pleasurable to press a door handle shining from the thousands of hands that have entered the door before us; the clean shimmer of ageless wear has turned into an image of welcome and hospitality. The door handle is the handshake of the building. The tactile sense of connects us with time and tradition: through impressions of touch we shake the hands of countless generations.”


Juhani Pallasmaa, The Eyes of The Skin, Architecture and the Senses


We live within a continuous stream of visual information that prioritises the ‘image’. As Juhani Pallasmaa highlights in his book The Eyes of the Skin, the hegemony of sight and its command over other fields of cultural production acts to distance us from our environment and our participation via lived experience. As with other forms of expression, ideas of form and image dominate the architectural profession. However, Pallamsaa’s writings remind us of the importance of physically connecting with architecture by placing ourselves within its environment and opening our senses to its influence.


Since classical times, the human body has been the measure of architecture; the careful design of proportion establishing an anthropometric reference between ourselves and our world, seeking to create harmony between our body and the places that we create. Like film, our appreciation of architecture is a fully immersive experience that asks us to engage with each of our senses and often encourages an emotional or behavioral response. Good places resonate with the craftsmanship of their making and the environments they create positively affect our wellbeing and sense of our self. We can only really know a building, or place, by inhabiting the spaces that they create. Architecture is something that cannot be appreciated by a static image alone.


So open that door, and your senses, to discover a place that makes a difference to you.

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Observations

Images from our Instagram account which capture idea, places and things that inspire us.
Western Harbour 7N Architects’ Western Harbour project has received a Commendation in the Future Project category at the Scottish Design Awards. Many thanks to our clients Forth Ports Ltd and Rettie & Co for commissioning such an ambitious, placemaking, approach to addressing Edinburgh’s acute housing needs.
The Knab, Lerwick We’re delighted to have won the Scottish Design Award in Master Planning for our Knab project in Shetland. It’s fantastic recognition for everyone involved, and wonderful to see this collaboration with the Lerwick community recognised.
Scottish Design Awards 2019 - We’re looking forward to joining everyone at the Scottish Design Awards in Glasgow this evening. We are delighted to be nominated in the Master Planning category for our Knab project in Shetland, and also in the Future Place category for our Western Harbour project in Leith. Pleased to be nominated among some great competition, good luck to everyone involved!
Scottish Design Awards 2019 - We’re looking forward to joining everyone at the Scottish Design Awards in Glasgow this evening. We are delighted to be nominated in the Master Planning category for our Knab project in Shetland, and also in the Future Place category for our Western Harbour project in Leith. Pleased to be nominated among some great competition, good luck to everyone involved!
Scottish Design Awards 2019 - We’re looking forward to joining everyone at the Scottish Design Awards in Glasgow this evening. We are delighted to be nominated in the Master Planning category for our Knab project in Shetland, and also in the Future Place category for our Western Harbour project in Leith. Pleased to be nominated among some great competition, good luck to everyone involved!
Jordanhill - Cladding
Jordanhill - Brickwork
Jordanhill - New Build Living Room - The phase 1 apartments are taking shape with internal fit out well underway. Scheduled for completion towards the end of the year, here is an in progress view showing one of the open plan living spaces, each of which has sliding doors out onto an inset 6m.sq balcony.
Demolition works progressing at Jordanhill.
David Stow, Jordanhill - Stonework conservation and repair works with replacement of all existing windows, now progressing to the buildings east facade.
David Stow Building - Stonework
What if...? Is a collection of ideas and propositions aimed at questioning, stimulating and inspiring positive change within the city we live and work in. They are ideas to stimulate discussion, debate and expansive thinking on how Edinburgh can be a better place for all its citizens. See our highlights or visit our website to view the full publication and watch the short film.
What if...? Is a collection of ideas and propositions aimed at questioning, stimulating and inspiring positive change within the city we live and work in. They are ideas to stimulate discussion, debate and expansive thinking on how Edinburgh can be a better place for all its citizens. See our highlights or visit our website to view the full publication and watch the short film.
What if...? Is a collection of ideas and propositions aimed at questioning, stimulating and inspiring positive change within the city we live and work in. They are ideas to stimulate discussion, debate and expansive thinking on how Edinburgh can be a better place for all its citizens. See our highlights or visit our website to view the full publication and watch the short film.
This is the opening week for the Holyrood Distillery, Edinburgh’s first new single-malt whisky distillery in almost 100 years. The project has been designed by 7N Architects and delivered in collaboration with ISG Construction, Blyth and Blyth, David Adamson Group, ICENI projects, Cubit3D and Threebrand as well as a fantastic team of specialist contractors and craftspeople. Located at the foot of the Salisbury Crags, the new distillery involves the adaptive reuse and extension of the Grade B listed former railway terminus. Unlike in traditional distilleries - where the visitor experience has often been retrospectively grafted onto the existing distilling installation – the Holyrood Distillery weaves the visitor experience into the distilling process from the beginning. 7N’s approach combines heritage and modernity by revealing the historic character of the original building and enhancing it with a new extension as both the arrival point for visitors and the climax of the visitor experience. The tasting area is orientated towards Salisbury Crags so that visitors can savour a dram at the end of their journey whilst looking out to the dramatic landscape which embeds the experience in Scotland's Capital City. 7N would like to thank everyone involved in bringing the project to fruition and wish the Holyrood Distillery team all the very best with their new venture.
This is the opening week for the Holyrood Distillery, Edinburgh’s first new single-malt whisky distillery in almost 100 years. The project has been designed by 7N Architects and delivered in collaboration with ISG Construction, Blyth and Blyth, David Adamson Group, ICENI projects, Cubit3D and Threebrand as well as a fantastic team of specialist contractors and craftspeople. Located at the foot of the Salisbury Crags, the new distillery involves the adaptive reuse and extension of the Grade B listed former railway terminus. Unlike in traditional distilleries - where the visitor experience has often been retrospectively grafted onto the existing distilling installation – the Holyrood Distillery weaves the visitor experience into the distilling process from the beginning. 7N’s approach combines heritage and modernity by revealing the historic character of the original building and enhancing it with a new extension as both the arrival point for visitors and the climax of the visitor experience. The tasting area is orientated towards Salisbury Crags so that visitors can savour a dram at the end of their journey whilst looking out to the dramatic landscape which embeds the experience in Scotland's Capital City. 7N would like to thank everyone involved in bringing the project to fruition and wish the Holyrood Distillery team all the very best with their new venture.
This week is opening week for the Holyrood Distillery, Edinburgh’s first new single-malt whisky distillery in almost 100 years. The project has been designed by 7N Architects and delivered in collaboration with ISG Construction, Blyth and Blyth, David Adamson Group, ICENI projects, Cubit3D and Threebrand as well as a fantastic team of specialist contractors and craftspeople. Located at the foot of the Salisbury Crags, the new distillery involves the adaptive reuse and extension of the Grade B listed former railway terminus. Unlike in traditional distilleries - where the visitor experience has often been retrospectively grafted onto the existing distilling installation – the Holyrood Distillery weaves the visitor experience into the distilling process from the beginning. 7N’s approach combines heritage and modernity by revealing the historic character of the original building and enhancing it with a new extension as both the arrival point for visitors and the climax of the visitor experience. The tasting area is orientated towards Salisbury Crags so that visitors can savour a dram at the end of their journey whilst looking out to the dramatic landscape which embeds the experience in Scotland's Capital City. 7N would like to thank everyone involved in bringing the project to fruition and wish the Holyrood Distillery team all the very best with their new venture.
Fort William Concept Design ; One Bed Apartments
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